5 Things to Know About the Second Season of 'The Crown'

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After months of waiting and anticipating for this Emmy-award winning show, the second season of Netflix' The Crown is finally here! 

Set between the mid-1950s and 1965, The Crown will continue to chronicle the life of Queen Elizabeth II (Claire Foy). Just like the first season, it will tackle some of the major political and global events that shaped and made an impact not only to Great Britain, but also to the whole world. 

Whether you're already done binge-watching the show or are just about to, we're giving you 6 facts on the latest season of The Crown. If spoilers aren't your thing, better bookmark this page and come back for when you're done watching everything!

1. This is Claire Foy and Matt Smith's last season as the royal couple 

The Crown
Photo: Coco Van Oppens / Netflix

Naturally, the Queen needs to age as the show continues to move forward in the next decades of her life. So as much as we love Claire Foy and her portrayal of our favorite Queen, we're going to have to say goodbye to her after this season. She will be replaced by Olivia Colman (The Lobster, Skins, and Murder on the Orient Express) for the third and fourth season. 

Matt Smith, who plays Prince Philip, will also not be coming back next season, although his replacement is yet to be announced. 

2. The season begins with the Suez Crisis

The Crown
Photo: Robert Viglasky / Netflix

In 1956, the Israeli armed forces, joined by France and the Great Britain, invaded the Suez Canal as a way to remove Egyptian president Gamal Abdel Nasser from power. Knowing she had no authority on the nation, the Queen had no choice but to watch from afar as the plans of then Prime Minister Eden take place (and fail, eventually). 

According to the show's creator, Peter Morgan, the Suez Canal Crisis of 1956 was a turning point in the history of Great Britain, so they felt like it was the best way to start the sophomore season. 

3. Margaret gets a new love interest

Photo: Alex Bailey / Netflix

Fresh from her heartbreak after being separated from Captain Peter Townsend, Princess Margaret meets photographer Antony Armstrong-Jones (eventually Lord Tony Snowdon), who she realizes she has a lot of things in common with - from their huge egos to their rebellious attitudes. With Vanessa Kirby's Princess Margaret and Matthew Goode's Lord Snowdon, their chemistry on-screen is just undeniable, making their romance flow perfectly.

4. The show will be tackling the rumors on Prince Philip's infidelity

Photo: Alex Bailey / Netflix

The season shows the Queen and Prince Philip's relationship go on a rough patch, especially as Philip spent most of the season away from home. He becomes more distant not only to his wife, but also to their children, resulting to the many allegations of his infidelity. 

In real life, though, Prince Philip is rumored to have had affairs with actress Patricia Kirkwood. Although Kirkwood denied these, and the Palace made no statement regarding it, some people are said to have confirmed of it. 

5. President John Kennedy and Jackie Kennedy will make an appearance

Photo: Alex Bailey / Netflix

The sophomore season of The Crown will also be showing the meeting of the Royal couple and the Kennedys back in 1961, with Michael C. Hall portraying JFK and Jodi Balfour as Jackie Kennedy. This meeting caused quite a stir back then, especially when the First Lady invited her siblings - both divorcees at that time - to the State dinner. This was despite the rule that divorcees weren't allowed in these kinds of events. 

The show will also show the tension between the two ladies, particularly when the Queen learns that Mrs. Kennedy had "bad-mouthed" her and her house to her friends. This may not be entirely true, though, as it was said to have been based on show creator Peter Morgan's imagination. 

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The Crown is now streaming on Netflix

 

 

TV Show Info

Biography, Drama
Creator
Peter Morgan
Produced By
Netflix

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